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Saturday, 02 August 2014

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Wind turbines approved for Potato Pot in west Cumbria

A controversial project to build massive wind turbines in west Cumbria is to go ahead.

Three masts – each 328ft (100 metres) high – are to be erected near Workington after a firm won an appeal against their refusal.

Allerdale council had denied developers Airvolution Energy permission for their proposed scheme at Potato Pot, near Branthwaite.

But it emerged last night the scheme had been given the go-ahead after a public inquiry heard by a planning inspector.

Work is now poised to start in the second half of next year.

Airvolution chief executive Richard Mardon said: “This project on a brownfield site has all the right ingredients for a great wind project – so it’s a shame it had to go to inquiry at all.

“Despite being held in April, the decision has been a long time coming but thankfully sense prevailed.”

The inquiry was held in following an appeal by Airvolution after Allerdale Council failed to determine the application within the agreed time frame.

During that hearing, the authority was criticised by the inspector, who described its case as the most poorly presented he had seen in 17 years.

Airvolution say the three turbines could produce enough electricity to power 3,800 homes every year.

It will bring with it a community fund paid to support groups in the area surrounding the mast. That will be worth £18,000 nationally, totalling £450,000 over the 25-years the turbines are expected to operate.

During the inquiry, Allerdale council denied it had acted unreasonably.

It argued that the proposal would have “significant” and “adverse” effects on the landscape and the Lake District National Park.

And concerns persist about the number of turbine planning applications.

Have your say

The planning inspector's report makes interesting reading (http://goo.gl/dXs4NU) if only because he seems to think that "The proposed turbines would dominate the view across the open ground from
the windows in the dwelling and from the sitting out and garden areas. At the
property, however, the eye is drawn to the expansive view east to the Lakeland fells
and the turbines would not significantly intrude into this view. ". That's nice then - if you're affected, just look the other way!

Posted by NS on 31 October 2013 at 08:48

will it never end,? why do we in cumbria and the scottish boarders have to suffer them. get a couple but up in whitehall or on the mall.!

Posted by m patrickson on 29 October 2013 at 08:12

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