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Monday, 24 November 2014

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Ex-barman banned for life from every pub in north Cumbria

A former barman has been banned for life from every pub in north Cumbria because of the way he terrorised a licensee who refused to give him a job.

Mark Stalker, 25, was working at the Lane End on the A69 at Hayton, between Carlisle and Brampton, when it was taken over by the licensees of another local pub.

When he heard that the new bosses did not like his attitude and would not keep him on, he went to their other pub – the Haywain at Little Corby - and caused so much trouble he ended up in front of a judge on a charge of violence.

Even before his case had reached the court, Stalker had been given a lifetime ban from every pub under the local Pubwatch scheme, which bans him from entering any pub in the area either as an employee or a customer.

At Carlisle Crown Court, Stalker, of Cairn Crescent, Corby Hill, pleaded guilty to putting people “in fear of violence” by affray.

He was remanded on bail for background reports, and will be back in court to be sentenced on March 22.

In the meantime, he was banned from both the Haywain and the Lane End Inn, and banned from contacting licenses Karen Teasdale and Adrian Dye in any way.

His barrister Elizabeth Muir said Stalker had led a troubled life, not least because he was “father figure” to his younger siblings.

“Despite the fact that he has previous convictions there are a large number of issues in this young man’s life,” she said.

“He has been the recipient of an extremely difficult upbringing.”

Ms Muir said Stalker had “gone off the rails” when he was 20 or 21, and had gone to live in Australia.

“But he felt he had to return to this country to assist with the children because his mother was struggling to cope and his father was dead,” she said.

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