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Friday, 31 October 2014

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Cumbria’s population rises by 12,000 in 10 years

Cumbria's population went up by more than 12,000 between 2001 and 2011, official figures show.

Eddie Martin photo
Eddie Martin

Carlisle saw the steepest rise and has overtaken South Lakeland as the county’s most populous district.

The Office for National Statistics has just released the first information gleaned from the 2011 Census.

This shows that Cumbria had a population of 499,900 on Census day, up 2.5 per cent from 487,606 at the last census in 2001.

Carlisle’s population jumped by 6.7 per cent from 100,721 to 107,500.

Allerdale’s increased by 3.1 per cent from 93,487 to 96,400, Copeland’s 1.8 per cent from 69,342 to 70,600, and Eden’s by 5.7 per cent from 49,770 to 52,600.

Despite this increase, Eden remains the most sparsely-populated district in England with just 25 people per square kilometre.

Barrow was the only Cumbrian district where the population fell. Its total declined by 4.0 per cent from 72,001 to 69,100.

The figures also show that Cumbria has fewer youngsters and more older people than the national average.

And while the number of people aged under 44 has fallen since 2001, the number aged 45 and older has risen.

Cumbria County Council leader Eddie Martin said: “The census data crystallises what we already knew.

“We have a faster than average ageing population, there are challenges in retaining younger people, we have to compete with cities and urban areas in generating economic growth.

“It means that the way we’re focusing our services is correct – we've been barking up the right tree.

“This new information will allow us to continue to lobby government to get a better deal for rural areas generally and Cumbria in particular.”

The Census also shows that women outnumber men.

There were 253,800 females in Cumbria but only 246,100 males.

The trend applies across the county except for Copeland, which has 35,500 males and 35,100 females.

Although Cumbria’s population is rising, it is not rising as fast as the country at large.

The total head count for England and Wales was 56.08m, an increase of 7.8 per cent since 2001.

The Census provides the most accurate estimate of population in England and Wales and has been carried out every 10 years since 1801, apart from 1941 when the country was at war.

Government uses the Census statistics to allocate funding for services such as education, transport and health.

More Census data will be published between November and February giving breakdowns of national identity, ethnicity, marital and civil partnership status, and religion.

 

Have your say

Realistically the population would increase far more in Cumbria with the right transport infrastructure but the likelihood of that happening is very slim with the current government who have great ideas like invest in the rail infrastructure but who does it benefit THE SOUTH AND AS FAR NORTH AS MANCHESTER!

May as well sink Cumbria and all move South!

Posted by Lee MW on 18 July 2012 at 21:55

For the love of historical accuracy, no official that I know of has ever tried to blame the mess of primary educational provision in North Carlisle on 'the cataclysmic impact of Labour's immigration policy'.

If you care to check articles say in this newspaper, you will see references to Moira Swann citing the impact of new housing as the reason for the increase in numbers (News and Star 14/09/09) and Brenda Wile indicating that fewer parents were sending children to private school (News and Star 15/09/09).

If as an council officer, you confidently present figures to the community without any caveats as to the variables and then your figures turn out to be seriously wrong and cause distress and hardship to individual children,(not to mention cost and expense to the taxpayer) any public servant must expect to be criticized.

For the love of God, isn't it time that we had a public apology by council officials?

Posted by A on 18 July 2012 at 17:39

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