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Thursday, 23 October 2014

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To Hellrigg and back - pupils visit Cumbrian windfarm

Pupils at a west Cumbrian school got up close to one of the county’s windfarms.

Windfarm photo
Oliver White and Alice Bryne, of RWE Innogy UK, with children from Holme St Cuthbert Primary School

The children, from Holme St Cuthbert Primary School, Mawbray, near Maryport, spent the day at Hellrigg windfarm near Silloth.

The visit was held to mark ‘Global Wind Day’, which also saw the youngsters take part in a workshop looking at the benefits of renewable energy.

Shelagh Daniel, headteacher at the school, welcomed the opportunity for her pupils to take part.

“Visiting Hellrigg windfarm was a fascinating experience for our junior pupils,” she said.

“Not only did we get the chance to stand under a turbine and appreciate its size and scale, but the educational workshop provided a means of learning about renewable energy.”

Michael Parker, RWE Innogy UK’s head of onshore wind, said: “Visits to windfarms, like this one, provide an exciting and interactive first-hand opportunity for youngsters to learn about the benefits of projects such as Hellrigg.

“We were delighted to be able to offer pupils this experience to link in with other Global Wind Day celebrations happening nationally.

“We were able to offer guided tours for two groups of pupils from Holme St Cuthbert Primary School and by all accounts, and looking at the happy faces following the tours, it seems the visits were a great success.”

RWE Innogy UK has 28 operating onshore windfarms.

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