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Sunday, 23 November 2014

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Sold Cumbrian country house hotel may become private residence

The former owner of a historic country house hotel near Carlisle has spoken of her sadness after it finally sold.

Pat Sedgwick photo
Pat Sedgwick

Crosby Lodge, in Crosby-on-Eden, went on the market in July 2012 with a hefty £825,000 price tag.

Rural property agents Smiths Gore, who were marketing the prominent 19th-century Grade II listed building, confirmed it had now sold.

It is not known exactly how much it fetched but its guide price had recently dropped to £775,000.

Previous owner Pat Sedgwick, who ran it as a country house hotel, revealed it was bought by local financial advisor Michael Cousins. She understands he plans to run the impressive sandstone Georgian property as a private residence, but Mr Cousins declined to comment.

Meanwhile, Pat, 77, told of her sadness at having to sell up after more than 40 years so she and husband Michael could retire.

She said: “I am very upset – my husband and I bought it at the end of 1970 and changed it from a private home to a hotel and restaurant.

“We ran it for 42 years and I miss it terribly – I miss the house, the staff and everything about it but unfortunately we got to the age where we had to retire.

“In all my time there I never got up in the morning and felt like I didn’t want to go to work.

“I still get customers asking me why it closed and I tell them that I got to the stage where my life changed.”

Crosby Lodge was one of the best-known country house hotels in north Cumbria. It played host to prime ministers – most recently David Cameron – as well as actors, pop stars, and was much loved by locals.

The building began construction in 1805 as a private residence by David Kennedy, who later became the Deputy Lieutenant of Cumberland. The family moved out after David was killed in a riding accident and it was eventually sold to George Saul in 1842.

It changed hands three more times before Pat and Michael acquired it and carried out extensive improvements.

Pat, who moved out in January, said “deep down” she wasn’t happy the home had sold but admitted that “things change”.

She added that she hoped the new owners would preserve its rich history.

“My biggest hope is that someone would love it as much as we did,” Pat said.

Without revealing the amount, Pat also said she had hoped the property would sell for more than it did. She added: “When we did decide to sell we got to the stage where we realised not many people had the amount of cash to meet the asking price.”

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