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Monday, 20 October 2014

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Shoppers and traders hit out at on-street parking charges

A disabled woman fears new on-street car parking charges will leave her stranded.

Ann Jenkinson photo
Ann Jenkinson

Related: On-street parking charges: Highways councillor responds

Related: On-street parking charges: Don't drive our recovery out of town

Marjorie Anderson suffers from Parkinson’s disease and says it’s difficult enough to get parked in Carlisle as it is.

But once Cumbria County Council implements the new parking fees Marjorie, of Newcastleton, will be forced to cut her journeys into the city even more.

She explained: “I used to always come into Carlisle and park in a free area near the Civic Centre.

“I have a disabled badge and I recently got a ticket for parking there even though it is a single yellow line – my son Kenneth complained but it got us nowhere.

“I used to do all my shopping in the city centre but as soon as the extra charges are introduced I’ll barely be able to come in at all.

“It’s a shame because I won’t be able to get the things I want.”

The News & Star is calling on the county council to rethink its plans for the new fees.

Our ‘Keep Our Streets Free’ fight for a fair deal, launched yesterday, has already sparked a huge outpouring of support.

Sarah McKie, owner of Pixie and Bob’s Baby Boutique in West Tower Street, Carlisle, said: “It’s awful because people can’t get parked in the city centre as it is.

“It’s bound to affect the shops round here because we’re on the outskirts which makes it even harder.”

Cameron McKay works at Meet Me At Miller’s cafe in The Market Hall where parking is already scarce.

He said: “The charges will only make it more difficult for our customers and it could affect business here.”

Fellow cafe worker Pat Allen added: “It’s ridiculous. Just look at the market now with all the shops closing – it’ll just get worse.”

Customer Alan McMurray, of Bower Street, fears for the future of the indoor market.

He said: “I think it’s terrible because it will stop people coming into the market and businesses will lose customers.”

Market trader Ann Jenkinson, who runs Habbinet, is worried the charges will deter customers, especially older ones, from shopping there.

“They’ll end up going somewhere else where they can park for free – like the supermarket.

“People should be encouraged to come into the city and these charges will be disastrous. There’s too many businesses going to the wall as it is.”

Carlisle City Council leader Colin Glover said the authority is considering the implications of the changes.

In the west of the county, businesses are also braced for an uncertain future.

Frances Martin, from The Original Factory Shop on Senhouse Street in Maryport, said: “I think paying for parking would tend to drive people out of the town centre.

“It’s hard enough to get people to come in the first place and if they have to pay to park then they’ll just end up going to somewhere like Dunmail Park in Workington.”

But Sam Bateman, who works in the I Do bridal shop on Main Street , Cockermouth, said: “I think people would probably still pay even if there was on street parking as Cockermouth is a really nice town to visit.”

Workington Mayor Konrad Hansen said neighbours in Peter Street in the town centre had already contacted him with concerns over their residents’ parking permits.

Mr Hansen is worried the permit won’t guarantee that they’ll be able to park near their homes as others use their spaces when they go out in the evenings.

“As some of the residents work in the emergency services and care services they need to be close to their vehicles to be somewhere else quickly,” he said.

The county council insists the charges are the “right thing to do” and are necessary to balance books.

Have your say

If all the motorists got together for one day and refuse to pay the parking fee. When a ticket is issued ask for your day in court. Can you imagine the chaos as everyone who attends and states his/her not guilty/guilty plea. I wonder how long it would take before the law was abolished..
I'm from Silloth

Posted by Herb C on 10 July 2014 at 02:22

At last we are seeing some of the District and Borough Councils standing up, it however beggars belief that ALL the District and Borough Councils have not stood up to this very clear cash cow policy of the county council (CCC)
http://www.newsandstar.co.uk/news/parking-charges-carlisle-council-totally-opposed-eden-threatens-call-in-1.1137169

CCC are scrapping the bottom of the barrel when they resort to methods such as stating:
"councillors argued that not implementing the scheme would hit services designed to protect vulnerable people."
DAVID ATTFIELD V THE LONDON BOROUGH OF BARNET

THE LAW IS EXPLICIT - PARKING CHARGES ARE ABOUT MANAGING CONGESTION, NOT RAISING REVENUE.

Mrs Justice Lang said that the 1984 Road Traffic Regulation Act "IS NOT A FISCAL MEASURE AND DOES NOT AUTHORISE THE AUTHORITY TO USE ITS POWERS TO CHARGE LOCAL RESIDENTS FOR PARKING IN ORDER TO RAISE SURPLUS REVENUE FOR OTHER TRANSPORT PURPOSES".

Posted by edd on 20 May 2014 at 13:34

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