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Tuesday, 16 September 2014

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On-street parking charges will not be good for Keswick, says deputy mayor

A town's deputy mayor has added her voice to growing opposition against Cumbria County Council’s plans to introduce parking charges.

The county council’s decision will see the abolition of disc zones, meaning shoppers will be forced to pay to park in 11 towns and cities in the county.

The plans are part of a multi-million pound savings budget, which county councillors approved last month.

Lorraine Taylor, town councillor and deputy mayor of Keswick, said she was worried about the effect the on-street charges will have, arguing that they will have a disproportionate impact on residents rather than tourists.

The town council has not discussed the issue but Mrs Taylor said: “I don’t think it will be a good thing for Keswick. I certainly think that it will effect local people that use the parking facilities that we have.

“We have one-hour facilities that people can use to pop into town and get prescriptions or go to the bank.

“That will impact on the people who live in the town.”

The other towns that would have charges introduced are Carlisle, Cockermouth, Keswick, Penrith, Maryport, Whitehaven and Workington.

In Carlisle, hundreds of people have voiced their opposition to the introduction of parking charges.

Shoppers and businesses leaders reacted with horror to the scheme, saying it would be a death knell for many small businesses.

An online petition against the charges has been launched, gathering at least 150 signatures.

Mrs Taylor said that she accepted that the county council had financial problems, but she was still concerned about the planned charges.

“I can understand the position that the council is in,” she said.

“I think it will affect residents rather than tourists who park for a few hours.

“As a town council we would be worried what the next stage was and how far they would take it.”

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