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Friday, 01 August 2014

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New Carlisle city centre bins in bid to stub out cigarette butt litter

New litter bins have been installed in Carlisle’s city centre as part of a campaign to stop the dropping of cigarette butts.

Elsie Martlew photo
Elsie Martlew

The 15 bins have ash trays fitted into the top for discarded cigarettes. They replace older bins which are damaged or were in need of repair or replacement.

Councillor Elsie Martlew, who has responsibility for the environment and transport, said: “We are replacing the bins to encourage smokers to put their cigarette butts into the bins instead of throwing them onto the floor, the bins also help improve the aesthetics of the city centre, as several bins were damaged or worn out.

“There’s no excuse to drop litter, including cigarette butts. A zero tolerance approach is being taken and fines will be given to those who litter our pavements and parks.”

The new litter bins have been installed outside the Civic Centre and the pedestrianised shopping area.

They are part of a campaign to make Carlisle cleaner. Carlisle City Council wants residents and businesses to pledge their support to the Love Where You Live campaign.

Some local residents and businesses have already pledged their support and feature on marketing material displayed on Focsa recycling vehicles and Stagecoach buses.

These include Jenny Cray, of Harraby, Carlisle: mother and daughter, Tina and Lydia Leith from Etterby, Carlisle; Robert Mitchell, a city council environment services team leader; and Jake Clarke and Gemma Morton from McDonald’s on Scotch Street.

The council wants to make city streets cleaner and stamp out litter, dog fouling and fly tipping. A new enforcement and education team is in place.

The team co-ordinate the work of the dedicated anti-dog fouling and littering staff and educating programmes.

The number of fines issued has increased since the team came into force. Court action has also been taken against those who refuse to pay up.

As part of the Clean Neighbourhoods and Environment Act, officers can issue fixed penalty fines of up to £80 to people who drop litter, fly-tip, spray graffiti, fly-post or fail to clean up their dog’s mess.

Have your say

Michael how easy but why no one seems to try.The cost will be very little as they should be talking every day.Come on give it a go and tidy up our city and estates. City Desk

Posted by Kenny Simpson on 1 January 2013 at 17:27

Amazing, how many meetings did it take for them to realsie that where there is a bin people will use it, maybe not all but most.I seriously cannot believe that something as simple as this is a news story.

Posted by Andy on 27 December 2012 at 23:41

View all 27 comments on this article

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