Strawberry Field gates to go on show at Beatles museum

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The original structures were replaced with replicas in 2011 to protect them from damage
The original structures were replaced with replicas in 2011 to protect them from damage
1 June 2017 12:15AM

The original gates of the children's home which inspired the Beatles song Strawberry Fields Forever will go on display in Liverpool.

The red gates of the former Salvation Army children's home, where John Lennon played as a child, have become a site of pilgrimage for fans of the Fab Four since the hit was released 50 years ago.

But the original structures were replaced with replicas in 2011 to protect them from damage.

The Salvation Army, the custodians of the Strawberry Field site, had been keeping the gates in storage but has loaned them to The Beatles Story museum, on the city's Albert Dock, where they will go on display on Thursday.

Martin King, of The Beatles Story, said: "We are delighted to join forces with The Salvation Army to showcase the original Strawberry Field gates to our visitors.

"They are a real piece of Beatles history and it's a privilege to display such a special exhibit here at The Beatles Story."

Earlier this year, the charity announced plans to redevelop the site in Woolton, south Liverpool, close to where Lennon grew up with his aunt Mimi.

The redevelopment will include a training and work placement hub for young people with learning disabilities as well as an exhibition on the place, the song and Lennon's early life around Strawberry Field. 

Major Drew McCombe, divisional leader for The Salvation Army, North West, said: "Strawberry Field has a very special history, both for its connection to John Lennon and the song Strawberry Fields Forever, and for its history as a place for solace for Liverpool's most vulnerable people.

"By joining with The Beatles Story to exhibit the iconic, original Strawberry Field gates, we hope to raise awareness of the exciting plans we have to reinvigorate the Strawberry Field site, as well as giving Beatles fans the opportunity to see a slice of Fab Four history."