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Thursday, 24 April 2014

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Jail for Cumbrian man who attacked woman in booze-fuelled rage

A drunken thug who squeezed the life out of his uncle four years ago has been jailed for a “brutal” attack on his girlfriend.

Edward Celmins photo
Edward Celmins

Related: Carlisle man jailed for manslaughter to be sentenced for beating up girlfriend

Edward Celmins, 29, has been handed down a 27-month prison sentence by the Honorary Recorder of Carlisle, Paul Batty QC – the same judge who, in December 2008, jailed him for four years for manslaughter.

Judge Batty said: “In that offence you were heavily intoxicated and effectively squeezed the life out of your uncle who had been drinking with you.

“Here, not long after the expiration of your licence period, you are again involved in violence, again in a domestic situation and again under the influence of drink.”

The court heard that Celmins attacked his girlfriend Emma Jane Taylor and threw her onto the street in her pyjamas after she had taken exception to his attempts to seduce another woman in front of her.

Judge Batty said that Miss Taylor “depressingly” wanted to take him back and had also retracted her original statement.

But seeing photographs of her injuries, judge Batty “emphatically rejected” the victim’s letter and refused to be swayed by it.

He said that the bruising indicated that Celmins had given her a “bad beating up” which amounted to a “sustained and brutal assault”.

He added that domestic abuse victims retracting their statements was “a depressingly frequent occurrence” and did not move him as far as sentencing was concerned.

He said: “Your partner, whom you assaulted, depressingly wants to be with you and depressingly wants to retract her statement.

“You completely lost your temper, pinned her to the sofa and slapped and punched her about the head and upper body.

“She ended up on the floor. You picked her up in her pyjamas and pushed her into the street such was your contempt for her.”

Celmins had consumed “just shy” of a litre of vodka and half a bottle of cider on July 22 when the argument started.

Brendan Burke, prosecuting, said: “There had been a disagreement over whether he had affections for a female neighbour.

“She [the neighbour] came around at 9pm upon which he started making sexual advances.

“Miss Taylor took exception to this, trying to get his hands off the female neighbour.”

The court heard that Celmins then pinned Miss Taylor to the sofa, hit her three times then picked her up and threw her outside where she landed in a bush.

She suffered a black eye, swelling and bruising to her neck, arm and wrist.

However, she did not suffer a fractured cheekbone as had originally been thought.

When interviewed by police Celmin had denied the attack.

Mr Burke said: “When interviewed he had said he would never hurt a woman and that wasn’t his style and suggested that she had probably inflicted the injuries herself.”

However, he pleaded guilty on Monday to causing actual bodily harm though he denied a second charge of common assault.

Celmins has previous convictions for criminal damage, assault, possession of cocaine and of prohibited weapons.

Marion Weir, defending, said he was “desperately ashamed”.

“He feels he is getting dangerously close to a pattern of domestic violence he saw in his own home growing up” she said.

It was on Saturday, April 26, 2008 that Celmins, of Richmond Green, Harraby, Carlisle, “squeezed the life out of” his uncle, 46-year-old Karl Celmins, after an afternoon spent drinking.

Celmins denied manslaughter, claiming he had only been trying to defend himself when his uncle lunged at him during a “scuffle” at the older man’s flat in Stonegarth, Morton.

But he was found guilty on a majority verdict.

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