Wednesday, 07 October 2015

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Cumbrian man attacked boss with hammer in tools row

A man hit his boss with a hammer because he thought he wasn’t being given the tools he needed to do his job on a building site.

David Masheder, a plasterer, struck out with the hammer after site manager Mark Vickers told him the drill bits he needed would not be available for another few days, Carlisle Crown Court heard.

The men – working on a building site in Victory Crescent, Maryport, last November – were both wearing hard hats so Mr Vickers was not badly hurt.

Masheder, who is 46 and lives in Springfields, Wigton, pleaded guilty to causing Mr Vickers actual bodily harm.

The court heard there had been “tensions simmering” between the two men for some time, largely because Mr Vickers did not like the way Masheder tended to make his complaints in front of other people – including clients – rather than in private.

On November 21 the over-all project manager David Lister was visiting the site and speaking to Mr Vickers when Masheder approached to complain that he was not being given all the tools he thought he needed.

When Mr Vickers told him he would have to wait a few days, Masheder became angry and, as he walked away, gave him a V-sign.

The two men then started arguing and came to blows, with Masheder taking a swing with the hammer he happened to have in his hand, the court heard.

Mr Vickers received a glancing blow and suffered a minor injury to his forehead, although he still has a small scar, and Masheder received a few bruises.

“He felt that his boss was the aggressor – though his boss took a different view,” defence advocate Mark Shepherd told the court yesterday .

Mr Shepherd said the incident had been caused by Masheder’s frustration.

“He has been a plastered for 22 years and he felt he was not being given the correct tools for the job,” he said. “He had previously expressed his desire for the drill bits he required to carry out the work, but they were not delivered.”

Masheder, the father of two small children, was ordered to do 200 hours unpaid community work.


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