X

Cookies

Continue We want you to get the most out of using this website, which is why we and our partners use cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to receive these cookies. You can find out more about how we use cookies here.

Saturday, 20 December 2014

Subscriptions  |  evouchers  |  Jobs  |  Property  |  Motors  |  Travel  |  Dating  |  Family Notices

Circular building focus of Roman dig in Maryport

A circular building, which could be a second temple, is the focus of the fourth University of Newcastle dig at Maryport's Roman fort.

Maryport dig photo
Ian Haynes and Rachel Newman

The excavations have been commissioned by the Senhouse Museum Trust after archaeologists last year confirmed the remains of a rectangular building on the site was almost definitely a classic-type temple. It was, therefore, the most north westerly temple known in the Roman Empire.

Dig director, Professor Ian Haynes, said it was possible that the circular building next to it was a mausoleum of some kind, though he doubts it.

He said the structure closely resembles Arthur’s O’on, a circular Roman temple discovered in Scotland which was destroyed after being excavated.

Prof Haynes said he is also looking at ditches which he believes could provide “finds that might not seem spectacular but could provide us with vital information about how the Roman army and the civilian settlements attached to the forts lived.”

He said there is a lot of information about the Roman frontiers in the second and third centuries but very little in the fourth. “I am hoping these excavations will help us to solve some of the puzzle,” he said, as the dig was opened up to the media yesterday.

Senhouse trustee, Rachel Newman, said the idea is to put the museum’s internationally-renowned Roman altar collection into context.

The altars were found on site but appeared to be being used as building materials.

Heritage consultant and Hadrian’s Wall expert, Nigel Mills, said the excavations of the fort and civilian settlement in Maryport were important. “In fact the work being done all down the West Coast is of interest and is attracting more and more visitors,” he said.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE

News & Star What's On search





Vote

Are positive efforts to encourage more women into the nuclear industry necessary?

Efforts to better educate girls at school in sciences, technologies & maths would be more worthwhile

No, unless well qualified women are being turned away at Sellafield's door

Yes, girls and women need to know their career options are limitless

Show Result

Hot jobs
Scan for our iPhone and Android apps
Search for:
NEWS & STAR ON: