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Monday, 22 December 2014

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Ceremony marks start of construction of £10m Cumbrian college

The first step has been taken in the construction of Lillyhall’s £10m University Technical College.

andy ecutc1
Outside: The college is due to open next September

Eric Wright Construction broke ground on the site on Friday, next to the Energus Centre on Blackwood Road.

A ceremony was held at the centre to celebrate the work starting.

Guests included Workington MP Sir Tony Cunningham, Alan Smith, Allerdale Council leader, and some of the young people who have expressed an interest in attending the Britain’s Energy Coast college.

The college will specialise in energy, engineering and construction.

It is due to open next September with a first cohort of around 140 students, and up to 500 students studying there by 2018.

Sir Tony said: “We need to grow and develop our manufacturing industry and that means producing more skilled tradesmen, woman and technicians.

“What is important is that we see this is adding to our existing educational infrastructure in west Cumbria.”

Potential students found out more about the college and spoke to the college’s principal, Gary Jones.

Stephen Davis, 13, of Ghyll Bank, Little Broughton, is a year nine pupil at Cockermouth School and is interested in studying to become an aircraft mechanic.

He told the News & Star: “I have been very impressed. I am interested in the college because I like doing more hands-on work instead of written work.”

Owen Newbury, 15, of Skinburness Drive, Silloth, has applied to become an electrical engineer at the new college.

He said: “Going to the college means there will be a lot of opportunities to get into the industry and work at places such as Sellafield.”

Rob Rimmer, director of Britain’s Energy Coast campus, said: “It’s great that we have seen so many people turning out to see how the UTC is coming along.”

eparsons@cngroup.co.uk

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