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Monday, 22 December 2014

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Carlisle murder trial told: I didn’t see knives

A woman accused of murder after a Polish factory worker was stabbed to death outside his Carlisle home said that neither of her two co-defendants had a knife when they arrived at the man’s street.

Piotr Kulinski photo
Piotr Kulinski

Related: Man accused of Carlisle murder denies saying 'job is done'

Paulina Mucha, 26, has denied the offence, as have Piotr Zygner, 30, with whom she was in a relationship, and her cousin Sylwester Kawalec, 23, who all live at Currock Road, Currock.

A Carlisle Crown Court jury heard her yesterday give her account of what happened on the day when alleged murder victim Piotr Kulinski died.

The court has already heard Zygner claim that he had picked up a knife that was dropped by Mr Kulinski, and he said he used it on Mr Kulinski only to stop him attacking his friend Kawalec

In her evidence, Mucha said she had started a relationship with Zygner about two weeks before the date of the tragedy, on October 14 last year. The evening before it happened, she had been with the other two defendants at a party.

She had taken an ecstasy tablet, and was drinking. On a drunkenness scale of one to ten, she put herself as being five or six.

When the group left the party, as far as she was concerned they had been going to return to Currock Road after dropping off a friend.

A passenger in the back of the car when they set off, with Zygner driving, she had not known that they were going to Arnside Road, and nor did she know Kulinski, she said.

She recalled how they parked behind a white van, and as Zygner and Kawalec got out, her cousin told her to get behind the wheel.

Her defence barrister William Lowe QC asked her: “Did you say anything?” She replied: “From what I can remember, I asked him why.

“But it was too late because he went away.”

She got behind the wheel and waited in the car for a few minutes while the two men were away.

Asked what happened when they returned to the car, she said: “Sylwester told me to go, and I drove away.”

Mr Lowe said the court had heard earlier that she did not drive away fast, and he asked her how she felt at that time.

She said: “I was drunk after the pill. I was not feeling good.” Later she stopped the car, saying she felt drunk, so Kawalec took over.

Mr Lowe asked if there had been any talk of a knife during the drive to Arnside Road. “No,” she replied.

“When they got out of the car did you believe either of them had a knife of them?” asked Mr Lowe.

“No,” she replied.

Later that morning, after returning to her friend’s house, she said she had noticed spots of blood on Zygner’s hands, but thought he had been fighting, but she did not ask him what happened.

Afterwards, because she had just moved into a room at Currock Road, she wanted to go to a car boot sale at Hexham, so just before 10am they set off.

Two other defendatns – Artur Skoczen, 30, of Ashman Close, Denton Holme, Carlisle, and Artur Woszczyna, 44, of Beverley Rise, Harraby, Carlisle – deny conspiring to pervert the course of justice by trying to dispose of evidence after the death of Mr Kulinski, Mr Kulinski, who worked at the city’s Cavaghan & Gray factory.

The trial continues.

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