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Thursday, 23 October 2014

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Carlisle mum leaves young child locked in house

A young girl was left locked in a bedroom without food or drink while her mum was spotted in Carlisle city centre.

The woman, who cannot be identified for legal reasons, appeared at Carlisle Magistrates’ Court and admitted one charge of ill-treating or neglecting her daughter.

District Judge Gerald Chalk was told that on the afternoon of July 25 the girl, who is pre-school age, had been left for several hours in a locked bedroom with the windows closed.

The court heard that the mother, in her early 20s, was spotted in Carlisle by a neighbour at about 1pm that day – without her child.

The neighbour attempted to get into the house in the west of Carlisle, where the young girl was heard shouting from an upstairs window that she was hungry and wanted a drink.

The police were called at about 3.45pm and forced their way in.

Prosecutor Lisa Hands said officers found the bedroom door was also locked, with the girl inside.

They forced their way in, Judge Chalk was told, and found the bedroom was dirty. They reported that there was no food and nothing the child could drink.

Her ‘potty’ was overflowing and faeces was found on the bedroom floor. There were no toys in the bedroom, the prosecutor added.

In a police interview the mother said “she just had to get out of the house and be alone” as she had been having problems with the child.

The woman told officers that she had fed and given a drink to the child before she left her alone, but agreed that theoretically she had neglected and abandoned her daughter.

District Judge Chalk adjourned sentencing until August 29 for pre-sentence reports to be prepared.

However, the mother was warned that all options remain open – including the possibility that the case may be sent to crown court.

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