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Thursday, 23 October 2014

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£3m scheme to get rid of Siddick smell completed early

A £3 million scheme to tackle odours at Workington’s sewage works has been completed ahead of schedule.

The major project by water company United Utilities means every process unit on the site at Siddick is now sealed with air-tight covers and linked to the on-site odour-control unit.

It is the latest of several multi-million pound improvements to theplant following complaints from local people andbusinesses.

Four years ago United Utilities spent £4m upgrading the most problematic areas of the plant, but some smells remained.

Production manager Roy Dunbar said: “Workington's Wastewater Treatment works does a great job but we have had a problem with odours, especially when the weather was warm and dry, we have worked hard for local people and this new project should make a big difference.”

United Utilities’ sewage works at Siddick was built in 1996 as part of a regional scheme to clean up the north west coast.

“It's worth remembering how important this work is to this part of Cumbria,” said Mr Dunbar.

“It has played a huge part in improving standards of waste treatment and is a strategic part of our local network. There aren't many other places which have played such an important role in cleaning up the Solway coast and its beaches.”

The project was due to be completed by the end of the year, but the new equipment has been operational since mid-October.

Project manager Greg Parkinson said the work had gone exactly to plan and the new equipment was in use ahead of schedule and within budget.

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