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Saturday, 01 November 2014

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Anger over new homes estate plan for Carlisle

Residents are fighting plans for a new housing estate on a green field site south of Carlisle.

Carleton housing site photo
Land at Carleton Farm, Carlisle

Persimmon Homes wants to build 176 homes at Carleton, on land south of Cumwhinton Road.

But the plan has triggered up to 50 objection letters from residents who live nearby, with one claiming the density of homes proposed would make them resemble “a wall” at the end of her garden.

The developer says the scheme, on land that is part of Carleton Farm, would be a “thriving urban extension” that would blend well with existing homes.

Persimmon hopes to build a mix of two and four-bedroom houses, 30 per cent of which would be classified as affordable.

If approved, the project would be the latest in a series of major housing developments in the city.

But residents seem determined to fight the scheme, fearing it will spoil the character of homes currently overlooking open fields. Their key objections include:

  • The high density of dwellings, which at 33 per hectare is above the recommended number of 30, according to objectors;
  • The likely increase in traffic from the estate;
  • The loss of privacy and rural views for residents who currently live next to what is a farmer’s field;
  • The impact on local property values;
  • Fears that there is no demand for so many new homes in Carlisle.

One Mallyclose Drive resident has told planners: “The proposal has too many dwellings on this size of site. They would be built so close together that they almost form a wall at the back of the existing bungalows, cutting out all privacy and reducing light.”

Dorothy Wilkinson, who lives in Farbrow Road, says in her letter: “Who is going to buy or rent these dwellings? There are homes all over Carlisle for sale.”

Another resident suggests the scheme flies in the face of council planning for 600 new homes a year for the next 15 years – a target already met by existing developments for the next two years.

Nick Weston, objecting on behalf of his parents, who live in Mallyclose Drive, says: “There are currently a large number of housing developments in Carlisle and my understanding is that these do not yet have full occupancy.

“There has also recently been a planning agreement ‘in principle’ on 318 houses in Blackwell, so unless there is to be a large increase in the local population and substantial employment growth this would be a development that is superfluous to current housing requirements.”

Mr Weston adds that unused “brownfield sites” should be built on first.

In its application, Persimmon Homes describes the scheme as a “sustainable urban extension” for the city, with good transport links.

The firm says its design will ensure anti-social behaviour is not encouraged, claiming there is no reason why the scheme would have an adverse effect its neighbours.

The statement adds: “This site would not take the council in great excess of the required five-year supply of sites. It would both help to meet the backlog and continue to meet future needs.”

Councillors aim to decide the application on March 21, though it could be determined as early as February 5.

Have your say

Just how much will a build of this nature knock off the price of our house that is located nearby? House prices are governed by,"Supply and demand". This housing surplus will surely eat in to the equity that is in our house? Myself and my husband have worked and saved hard in order to take early retirement. What a waste of time and effort that was then, eh ?

Posted by Sheila S. on 18 February 2014 at 17:05

Why is there such things as objections if no one listens anyway ?

Posted by lou on 17 February 2014 at 11:45

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