X

Cookies

Continue We want you to get the most out of using this website, which is why we and our partners use cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to receive these cookies. You can find out more about how we use cookies here.

Saturday, 20 December 2014

Subscriptions  |  evouchers  |  Jobs  |  Property  |  Motors  |  Travel  |  Dating  |  Family Notices

Almost third of children in Botcherby and Upperby living in poverty

Almost a third of children in some parts of Carlisle are living in poverty.

Joel Rasbash photo
Joel Rasbash

Latest figures show that those being brought up in Botcherby and Upperby are the worst affected.

Council leaders say the issue, which will today be discussed at length as part of Carlisle Healthy City Week, remains a “big concern”.

In the two areas, 32 per cent of children are now classed as living in poverty.

In Castle ward that figure is 26, Currock 23, Belle Vue 22 and Denton Holme 19.

The gulf is further illustrated when compared to other wards, with child poverty levels in Great Corby at just 2.9 per cent and Stanwix urban at four.

Joel Rasbash, strategic policy adviser at Cumbria County Council, said: “There are big differences between different parts of the city.

“A lot of it is down to income spreads of the people that live in these areas.

“We can link it to rates of homelessness, unemployment and average incomes.”

Today youth workers, children’s centre staff, social workers and health staff will come together to discuss the problems at length as part of Carlisle Healthy City Week.

Have your say

It's upsetting to think of a generation of children who are disadvantaged. It's not all about poor nutrition and living standards, the physical manifestations of poverty are obvious, its about the mental, emotional, psychological effects as well. It's about generations of young people lacking the knowledge and skills to achieve at school then succeed in a career, with no ambition and then no ways to access opportunities. The primary stages of education are crucial to achievement as an adult. Schools in the areas of Carlisle discussed here have received investment and do a good job, but they're not able to work miracles if the right environment isn't there at home. I know of young mums who love their kids dearly but do admit they are ill equipped to look after them. I would even cite many examples where children were conceived too young basically by parents who are really still kids themselves, then this is repeated again. To be honest this is not benefiting them or their children, as they don't have the economic or emotional means to provide an adequate environment for their kids to grow up in. Having a family when so young is an abdication of responsibility. Having children is a privilege and not a right. People often do not think seriously enough about what children deserve. Sadly the unborn child cannot choose its parents and its circumstances and as a society we must support the innocents in these situations. Every child deserves to be loved and cared for.

Posted by Anon on 6 November 2012 at 23:23

When people fall on hard times, perhaps they should sell their children into slavery. How thoughtless of them to conceive without imagining that global recession may impact on their lives in 10 years time.
I object intensely to poor people finding any enjoyment in life and resent the fact that they have television and access to the internet- let them poke excrement with sticks for entertainment like in the old days.
I demand that as a superior being I am able to look down on the less fortunate and vilify them for their hardship. The thought of putting myself in their shoes and imagining how difficult it must be to live in 21st Century Britain without access to technology is abhorrent to me. I do not care that the internet is now the default way to claim benefits as it impedes my self righteousness. Why, I even resent their having a working lavatory!

As I sit here patting myself on the back for my ability to disregard children's welfare it occurs to me that my dr may have been onto something when he suggested I may be a bit of a sociopath.

Anyway, pass me another soundbite, I need something to stoke the fire

Posted by Fiona on 6 November 2012 at 17:51

View all 50 comments on this article

Make your comment

Your name

Your Email

Your Town/City

Your comment


SHARE THIS ARTICLE

News & Star What's On search





Vote

Are positive efforts to encourage more women into the nuclear industry necessary?

Efforts to better educate girls at school in sciences, technologies & maths would be more worthwhile

No, unless well qualified women are being turned away at Sellafield's door

Yes, girls and women need to know their career options are limitless

Show Result

Hot jobs
Scan for our iPhone and Android apps
Search for:
NEWS & STAR ON: